Research

Research is vital for gaining a deeper understanding of nature. By conducting rigorous science with the support of both Scientists and Citizen Scientists, we work to understand the Cooloola Coast through effective and efficient research to inform our conservation efforts and strategic decision making. Our current research focus is on the biodiversity of the Cooloola Region and the threats to it.

We seek advice and guidance from our Scientific Advisory Group and our research partners to ensure the relevant expertise is available in research design. We also contract specialists to conduct research on our behalf and to support our Citizen Scientists and volunteers.

Voluntourism and Scientific Research Tourism Strategy

Development of the Cooloola Coast Voluntourism and Scientific Research Tourism Strategy 2020– 2030.

This research is funded with a grant from

Cooloola Sediment Investigation

Diving creeks to discover sources of sediment in Tin Can Inlet

Funded by Gympie Regional Council

Environment Levy

Completed June 2019

Moorings Investigation

Diving Tin Can Inlet moorings to discover sources of sediment in Tin Can Inlet

Funded by Gympie Regional Council

Environment Levy

Completed June 2019

Contract Research Services

Cooloola Coastcare can also assist researchers wanting to conduct research in the Cooloola Coast region.

For example, we currently manage 2 research assistants locally for a foreign PhD student conducting an international research project involving multiple sites worldwide.

Please contact the Coordinator to discuss your research needs.

Research Volunteers

Cooloola Coastcare has many research projects to conduct research in the Cooloola Coast region and always a shortage of researchers to complete these important investigations.

For example:

Is the Coxen's Fig Parrot extinct in this area?

Are there toxins in the waters of Tin can Inlet contributing to the loss of biodiversity and seagrass?

What is the population of dugongs are there in our area and what is their distribution? Are they maintaining, losing or gaining in number?

Please contact the Coordinator to discuss volunteer research opportunities.